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Let’s face it: no one wants tap water these days. How can we when we know exactly what’s in it? Municipally-treated water is full of chlorine, pesticides, and lead. Well, water can contain parasites, infectious diseases, and poisonous chemicals. Neither is 100% safe to drink.

What can we do, then? Usually, we buy sink filters, bottled water, and fancy refrigerators with built-in water dispensers. These are the most readily-available solutions on the market, so it makes sense that this is where we go first.

Are they really the best solutions, though? Even “cheap” refrigerators aren’t really cheap, and water bottles are, perhaps, the largest contributor to plastic waste. Wouldn’t it be so much easier, and cost-effective, if we could filter our entire home’s water supply in one go?

The answer is “yes.” The best water filter is one that services the whole house, not just one tap at a time. Here’s everything you need to know about whole house water filtration system cost, installation, and efficiency.

Whole House Water Filtration System Cost

Before we get into the details of how whole house water filtration systems work, let’s cut to the chase and address the elephant in the room: cost. If a water filter system costs an exorbitant amount of money, then any environmental or personal benefits it may provide will be worthless. Though inefficient, buying half a dozen water-filtering pitchers at $20 each is still cheaper than spending tens (or even hundreds) of thousands on a significant housing adjustment.

Thankfully, this isn’t the case. Most whole house water filtration systems cost between $150 and $3000. There are, of course, more expensive options in the >$10,000 range, but they aren’t the norm.

Still, $150 and $3000 is a significant price gap. The reason for this is the varying levels of complexity for whole house water treatment systems on the market. The two main types are traditional whole-house filters and reverse osmosis filters.

Traditional filters tend to be on the cheaper end while reverse osmosis filters are usually more expensive. This largely depends on how effectively each system purifies water. (We’ll get into specifics a bit later.) Either way, though, whole house water filtration systems won’t break the bank as you feared.

How Effective Is It?

The two types of whole-house water filtration systems vary in terms of efficacy. Without any extra bells and whistles, traditional installations will cover most customers’ needs. They remove at least 85% of chemical impurities, including microbials, simply by parsing water through a series of different filters. However, the design for these filters makes them less useful at removing large impurities before they can pollute the water stream.

Reverse osmosis filtration systems go a few steps further by removing 99% of all small pollutants and 100% of all large ones. Even better, they are designed to convert larger quantities of water with each sequence. These factors make them the ideal well water treatment systems.

That said, most experts still recommend the traditional installation as the best whole house water treatment system. They’re not as effective overall, but they produce much less wastewater. Moreover, they don’t strip away necessary minerals and chemicals like fluoride.

Installing a Whole House Water Filtration System

Regardless of the system you choose, you should definitely have a professional perform the installation. There are tutorial videos on YouTube how-to articles all over the internet, but, quite simply, the systems are much too complicated for the average DIY homeowner. Most brand name water filter companies offer this service at a discounted rate if you buy their model.

Even the discounts can be too expensive for the average person, though. If you live in Australia and you want a cheaper option, check out High Performance Filtration and ask for the best water filter system for you. They guarantee results you’ll be proud of.